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100 Objects

 
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Icon representing Grave cross 2Lt Arthur James Fisher, RFC
Grave cross 2Lt Arthur James Fisher, RFC

This is a German grave marker for 2nd Lieutenant Arthur James Fisher, RFC who was shot down in his B.E.12 aircraft by Manfred von Richthofen (The Red Baron) whilst flying with 21 Squadron. This marker would have been replaced with a gravestone at ...
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Icon representing Hales bomb
Hales bomb

The Hales Bomb was an early British aerial bomb, fitted with a wire handle above the fins to enable the bomb to be hand dropped over the side of an aircraft.
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Icon representing Hand cuffs (used by RAF Disciplinarians)
Hand cuffs (used by RAF Disciplinarians)

When the RAF was formed it was divided into three distinct branches - Technical, Disciplinary and Clerical. The majority of those serving in the Disciplinary branch were given the trade classification Disciplinarian - a role which policed and controlled the rapidly expanding air force. ...
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Icon representing Identity disc of C.T. Hodges
Identity disc of C.T. Hodges

This red compressed fibreboard identity disc was standard issue in the British Army during the First World War. This particular example was issued to 12402 C.T. Hodges.
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Icon representing Jottings of a Hun' article
Jottings of a Hun' article

Featured in 'Flying' magazine, 'Jottings of a Hun' in fact refers to the life of trainee pilots, who were referred to ironically by their instructors as 'Huns'.
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Icon representing King's Armistice message
King's Armistice message

The King's message to the Royal Air Force was written to thank those who had served. It states 'The birth of the Royal Air Force, with its wonderful expansion and development, will ever remain one of the most remarkable achievements of the Great War.'
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Icon representing Kit inventory and bill of Lt R.G. Mitchell
Kit inventory and bill of Lt R.G. Mitchell

Inventory of kit belonging to 2nd Lieutenant R.G. Mitchell, 26 March 1918, and bill from a military tailor for his new RAF kit. Officers purchased their uniforms privately from military tailors.
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Icon representing Lucky heather carried by Maj M. Mitchell-Clarke
Lucky heather carried by Maj M. Mitchell-Clarke

A piece of heather carried by Maj M. Mitchell-Clarke as a lucky charm.
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Icon representing Map of German Gotha raid
Map of German Gotha raid

Map 10 from Volume V of the official history 'The War in the Air' shows the track of Gotha aeroplane raids on Essex and Kent in May/June 1917. The Royal Air Force was formed largely in response to bombing raids such as this.
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Icon representing Map of London's anti-Zeppelin defences
Map of London's anti-Zeppelin defences

This map outlines the integrated reporting and command system used in the event of a Zeppelin air raid over London. It was a forerunner of the Dowding system used in 1940 during the Battle of Britain.
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Icon representing Message dropping streamer
Message dropping streamer

This colourful RFC double tail streamer was used for dropping written messages. When attached to a message bag, it was dropped from the aircraft over friendly lines. The streamer created drag thus reducing the speed of the message bag as it fell to the ground for retrieval. ...
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Icon representing Muster Roll (list of the RAF's founder members)
Muster Roll (list of the RAF's founder members)

The Muster Roll is essentially the Royal Air Force’s very own Domesday Book. It records information for every one of the 182,000 airmen serving in the RAF on the day of its formation, 1 April 1918.
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Icon representing Night Raid 1917
Night Raid 1917

This painting, by Christopher Nevinson, shows an aircraft resembling a Short Admiralty Type 184 on a night bombing raid. Ahead of the aircraft are bursts of anti-aircraft gunfire. The Royal Naval Air Service carried out the first night bombing raid ...
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Icon representing Note giving an airwoman 'Permission to associate' with an officer
Note giving an airwoman 'Permission to associate' with an officer

An indication of the social mores of the time, this note was issued by a commanding officer to allow Mbr Kathleen M.R. Wilson to associate with Capt John Christian Barraclough on Armistice Day, 11 November 1918.
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Icon representing Observation balloon
Observation balloon

This is a photograph of an RFC Kite Balloon Observer standing in an anchored balloon basket. Kite balloons were used as observation posts, from which information was transmitted by telephone to artillery units on the ground. ...
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Icon representing Observer badge (Pattern 1915)
Observer badge (Pattern 1915)

An Observer's 1915 Pattern clothing badge. The role of Observer was in its infancy on the outbreak of war, the badge only being formally introduced 23 August 1915. As the war progressed, their duties varied including navigation, wireless transmission, photographic reconnaissance, artillery spotting and aerial gunnery.
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Icon representing Painting of ' The visiting Corporal'
Painting of ' The visiting Corporal'

This painting, by Emile Antoine Verpilleux, shows an RFC airman carrying a Marconi pole which was used to support a wireless aerial. The Royal Flying Corps quickly mastered the use of wireless telegraphy and established a system of air-to-ground communication ...
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Icon representing Painting of 'Noon' in a wireless operators hut
Painting of 'Noon' in a wireless operators hut

This painting, by Emile Antoine Verpilleux, shows the interior of a hut near an artillery position. Messages from Observers in the air, reporting where the shells fired from their side were falling, were transmitted to the gun positions by means of wireless and then by megaphone. ...
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Icon representing Pilot's flying log book of an Ace
Pilot's flying log book of an Ace

This is the log book of British air ace Lieutenant Alexander George Vlasto, 31 August 1917-11 July 1918. Log books were used to record individual flights made by servicemen. They recorded observations such as weather and events which occurred whilst in flight.
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Icon representing Porcelain RNAS armoured car
Porcelain RNAS armoured car

The Royal Naval Air Service used armoured cars during the First World War, the most fondly remembered being those made by Rolls-Royce. A considerable number of commemorative porcelain items were produced in the form of tanks and armoured cars during the war.
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